Make it Your Way

The real beauty of wood comes from the natural qualities of the wood itself. Grain variations of solid hardwood and veneers will vary slightly from wild to nearly straight in appearance. These characteristics are what makes wood beautiful and distinct in color.

Choose from a variety of wood species: Alder, Cherry, Hickory, Maple, Oak, Rustic Alder, Rustic Hickory and Rustic Oak. All 35 door styles are available in ALL our wood species.

Alder Natural

Alder

Alder is a smooth hardwood with straight grain and an even texture. Its color can range from a light honey to a reddish-brown hue, similar to cherry. Alder will mellow in color (become a shade lighter) as it ages. As one of the softest hardwoods, alder can be easily dented or scratched.

Cherry Natural

Cherry

Cherry is a smooth, even-grained hardwood. It is characterized by its red undertones, but may vary in color from white to a deep, rich brown. Cherry has a fairly uniform texture, revealing pin knots and curly graining. Over time the finish will darken. This is a sought-after quality in cherry cabinetry, and those who select it expect this evolution.

Hickory Natural

Hickory

Hickory is a strong, heavy hardwood known for its distinctive and random graining patterns. There is a wide variety in color and streaking, ranging from white to dark brown, that can appear in a single door panel. These exaggerated characteristics are to be expected and are considered desirable in hickory cabinetry.

Maple Natural

Maple

Maple is a close-grained hardwood that is predominately white to creamy-white in color, with the occasional reddish-brown tones. Maple is characterized by its smooth, even grain pattern. Mineral streaks and tiny bird pecks are common and will appear darker when stained.

Oak Natural

Oak

Oak is a very strong, open-grained hardwood that ranges in color from white to pink to reddish tones. Streaks of green, yellow and even black may appear due to mineral deposits. Oak is known for its prominent grain pattern and texture that varies from a tight, straight grain to a distinctive arched pattern.

Step 3: Select Your Finishes